Tag: Ellie Midwood

Pre-order now The Road to Liberation: Trials and Triumphs of WWII collection!

Last year I was approached to join forces with other authors to create a collection celebrating the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. The theme? Liberation!

I’m pleased to announce that this bestselling collection is now available for pre-order on Amazon, Barnes and Nobles, Apple Books, and Kobo! Ten authors. Ten stories. Ten reasons never to forget.

With the number of the people alive during the war disappearing, it’s important now more than ever to remember the sacrifices they made.

Ten riveting stories dedicated to celebrating the end of WWII.

From USA Today, international bestselling and award-winning authors comes a collection filled with courage, betrayal, hardships and, ultimately, victory over some of the most oppressive rulers the world has ever encountered.

By 1944, the Axis powers are fiercely holding on to their quickly shrinking territories.

The stakes are high—on both sides:

Liberators and oppressors face off in the final battles between good and evil. Only personal bravery and self-sacrifice will tip the scales when the world needs it most.

Read about the heroic act of a long-term prisoner, an RAF squadron leader on the run in France, a Filipino family fleeing their home, a small child finding unexpected friends amidst the cruelty of the concentration camps, a shipwrecked woman captured by the enemy, and a young Jewish girl in a desperate plan to escape the Gestapo.

2020 marks 75 years since the world celebrated the end of WWII. These ten books will transport you across countries and continents during the final days, revealing the high price of freedom—and why it is still so necessary to “never forget”.

Included books are:

Stolen Childhood by Marion Kummerow

The Aftermath by Ellie Midwood

A Long Way Back by Fenella J. Miller

Prisoner from Penang by Clare Flynn

Too Many Wolves in the Local Woods by Marina Osipova

Adele’s Story by Rachel R. Heil

Liberation Berlin by JJ Toner

Magda’s Mark by Chrystyna Lucyk-Berger

Liberation Street by Kellie Butler

When’s Mummy coming? By Rachel Wesson

Buy now and indulge in more than 1000 pages filled with suspense, danger, heartbreak, and redemption.

This collection is at a bargain price of 99c/99p for a limited time, so reserve your copy now before the price increases!

Stay tuned on this blog in the coming months for posts from myself and other authors in the collection!

Book Review: Auschwitz Syndrome by Ellie Midwood

Auschwitz Syndrome Review

Ellie Midwood,

Released Oct 11, 2019

5 stars

There are books you devour, and then there are books you chew on for a while. Auschwitz Syndrome, the latest book by Ellie Midwood, is one you chew on.

From the courtroom and backroom drama of a Denazification court, we’re asked a few questions: Is Franz Dahler guilty of crimes against humanity? Did he beat, rape, and abuse a female inmate who worked under his command, a woman, Helena, who is now his wife? And did he marry her to secure his clearance from the court? You’ll have to make your own decision.

Auschwitz Syndrome is such an emotionally raw and painfully real book that I had to put it down on several occasions. Even the courtroom scenes crackled with intensity as the judge had to bring down his gavel else chaos would have ensued (and sometimes I felt it did, as he kept going back and forth between prosecution and defense).

The dismal imagery portrayed in the novel is hard on the reader, but in a setting such as Auschwitz, readers need to be reminded of just how brutal things got. Trust me in that you’ll hug your pets or children after this one. I had some good snuggles with my dog and blasted The Young Rascals on repeat for a while.

Some of the language may be difficult for readers to take, but I felt it leant towards the reality of the situation. I felt Ms. Midwood handled the sensitivity of the situation with skill and stayed true to the story. There were tender moments between Franz and Helena that lighten things.

The characters and storyline are largely based on real accounts, so if you want moving fiction, then pick up Auschwitz Syndrome. Just have puppies or kittens available for after you read it.

To purchase your copy, click here:https://amzn.to/2HDognH

 

Book Review: No Woman's Land: a Holocaust novel by Ellie Midwood

Disclosure: Please note that the link below is an affiliate link and at no additional cost to you, I’ll earn a commission. When you purchase books using my Amazon affiliate link, they compensate me, which helps make this blog possible. Know that I only recommend books that I personally stand behind, or feel could enrich others’ lives.

Rating: Five stars

There is historical fiction, and then there’s Ellie Midwood. No Woman’s Land is a superb novel that brings the Minsk Ghetto to life in all of its harsh cruelty with a sense of hope and grace. Reading a story of the dour conditions of the Holocaust can be difficult on a reader, but Ms. Midwood has crafted a powerful story of the meaning of loyalty, friendship, and love in the bitterest of conditions. 

One can’t help but cheer on ghetto occupants Ilse , Rivka, and Liza as they navigate the treacherous dog eat dog world of the ghetto while still holding on to the ultimate thing that keeps them alive: love. Although these three women, and others in the ghetto, come from diverging backgrounds, they form a solidarity as they keep each other together and the hope for freedom alive. Through this narrative, they discover the only thing that keeps one alive is love during the harshest of conditions.
I appreciate Ilse Stein’s character arc as we meet her as a timid, sheltered Jewish girl who arrives in Minsk after she and her sisters are resettled into the ghettos. There she meets women like Rivka and Liza, savvy leaders who lost husbands as the winds of war rage over the eastern front. Isle learns just how strong she is as she vows to survive and keep her sisters safe.
Although disillusioned and jaded, she learns to trust as she meets Willy Schultz, an officer in the Luftwaffe who befriends her. Their love story is sweet, tender, and real as they let their guards down while coming to terms with being from opposing sides.
This book left me wanting to know more of what becomes of Ilse, Willy, Liza, and all of their friends after the book ended, especially because these people existed during World War II. Highly recommended. 

Book Review: The Darkest Hour

 

 

darkest-final-new-kindle

Today on my blog I’m honored to review the stunning historical fiction anthology The Darkest Hour: A WWII Tales of Resistance featuring novellas by Roberta Kagan, Jean Grainger, Marion Kummerow, Ellie Midwood, Alexa Kang, Mary D. Brooks, Deborah Swift, Kathryn Gauci, John R. McKay, and Ryan Armstrong.

Full disclosure, grab a box of Kleenex and your favorite beverage with this book because you will need it. I connected with characters in such a way I was right there with them. I wish I could say that I read it all in one sitting, but I frequently found myself recovering from such a powerful collection of stories.

I will be the first to admit that I sobbed like a baby with Roberta Kagan’s Bubbe’s Nightingale. I rallied on some fierce heroines in Jean Grainger’s Catriona’s War, Alexa Kang’s The Moon Chaser, Mary D. Brook’s Enemy at the Gates, and Kathryn Gauci’s Code Name Camille. I felt the unbelievable struggle in deciding to choose between your husband and everything else in Marion Kummerow’s Reluctant Informer and Deborah Swift’s The Occupation. I felt right back in Prague in Ellie Midwood’s Killing the Hangman as two brave Czech operatives carried out the perilous mission of assassinating Reinhard Heydrich.  I was swept up with Charles’s small display of protest in  John McKay’s V for Victory as he proved that even small measures can help win a war. I was absolutely terrified for American teen Charles who had the mother of all worst uncles in Ryan Armstrong’s Sound of Resistance. (Seriously, you will need your favorite beverage of choice on that one. I will warn that the language and content was hard to stomach).

As a writer of a teenager heroine in the first book of my series, I will note that loved seeing courageous teens in this anthology. I felt the pain of Brook’s Zoe as she resolved to fight for her Greek homeland after losing her father. I cheered on McKay’s Charles on as he took chalk and paint and boldly marked V for Victory and Vive La France while waiting for his father to come home after being taken prisoner of war. I felt a bond with Armstrong’s Charlie with his love for jazz records amidst his uncle Erich’s brutality.

What always moves me with stories both as a writer and a reader is when I feel so strongly for the character, and each of these ten stories deliver. I loved too the variety of the ages and nationalities of these risk-taking, rule-breaking characters. They were awe-inspiring in courage and heroism. I loved them so much that I am buying more of their work to continue the story.

If you are looking for a good read that will warm these cold winter nights, please read The Darkest Hour. All proceeds go to a worthy cause at the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. If you’re ever in D.C, please go visit this museum. It will fill you with more stories of courage and inspiration amidst darkness.

To purchase your copy, click here: https://amzn.to/2R8uWgg