Tag: sagas

Northern Reads featuring Clare Flynn

Today on my blog I’m pleased to welcome the lovely Clare Flynn as she discusses her novel Storms Gather Between Us, partially set in Liverpool.

Welcome, Clare! Please tell us all about your book and why you chose Liverpool as a setting.

The book is an indirect sequel to my first novel, A Greater World, which has its opening chapters in the North of England, including Liverpool, but then transfers to Australia. Storms Gather Between Us focuses on one of the secondary characters whose career in the merchant navy brings him to Liverpool – where he becomes involved with other characters who were in the back story of the first book.

It’s a book about loss, domestic violence, the oppressive nature of religious bigotry but most of all about the redeeming power of love. It’s set in the late 1930s up to the outbreak of World War Two. It’s possible that at some time I may return to the characters and write another novel to take them through the war. I always endeavour to make my books work on a stand-alone basis and to complete the story arc – but that doesn’t stop people asking for more though – sometimes quite forcefully!

I was born in Liverpool but left as a child. I came from a large extended family so throughout my childhood we went back frequently for holidays – something I kept doing even through my years at university, often escaping to the Pool for weekends. As someone born in the mid-fifties, my childhood memories were tinged by the relics of the war – there were still empty plots on street corners where bombs had fallen, lots of ruin and decay and smoke-blackened buildings. Yet it felt magical and exciting to me as a child. Some of my favourite memories were taking the ferry across the Mersey to Birkenhead and New Brighton from the Pier Head, shopping in the big department stores especially Lewis’s and going to the seaside at Crosby and Formby. I have been able to draw on these memories in my writing.

Yet Storms Gather Between Us isn’t all pre-war Liverpool – the book also pays brief visits to Naples, Lisbon and Zanzibar – I’ve never been able to resist the lure of romantic locations.

Fascinating! What’s it all about?

Since escaping his family’s notoriety in Australia Will Kidd has spent a decade sailing the seas, never looking back. Content to live the life of a wanderer, everything changes in a single moment when he comes face to face with a ghost from his past on a cloudy beach in Liverpool.

The daughter of an abusive zealot, every step of Hannah Dawson’s life has been laid out for her… until she meets Will by chance and is set on a new path. Their love is forbidden and forces on all sides divide them, but their bond is undeniable. Now, they will have to fight against all the odds to escape the chains of their histories and find their way back to one another.

About the Author:

Clare Flynn writes historical fiction with a strong sense of time and place and compelling characters. She is the author of ten historical novels and a collection of short stories. Her books often deal with characters who are displaced – forced out of their comfortable lives and familiar surroundings. She is a graduate of Manchester University where she read English Language and Literature.

Born in Liverpool she is the eldest of five children. After a career in international marketing, working on brands from nappies to tinned tuna and living in Paris, Milan, Brussels, London and Sydney, she ran her own consulting business for 15 years and now lives in Eastbourne where she writes full-time – and can look out of her window and see the sea.

When not writing and reading, Clare loves to paint with watercolours and grabs any available opportunity to travel – sometimes under the guise of research.

Clare’s latest novel, The Pearl of Penang, was published in late 2019.

Where can we buy your books and follow you on social media?

Website http://www.clareflynn.co.uk

Twitter – https://twitter.com/clarefly

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/authorclareflynn

Amazon Author Page  http://www.amazon.com/Clare-Flynn/e/B008O4T2LC/

Instagram – https://instagram.com/clarefly 

Thanks so much for joining me, Clare! Always a pleasure!

Book Review: The Darkest Hour

 

 

darkest-final-new-kindle

Today on my blog I’m honored to review the stunning historical fiction anthology The Darkest Hour: A WWII Tales of Resistance featuring novellas by Roberta Kagan, Jean Grainger, Marion Kummerow, Ellie Midwood, Alexa Kang, Mary D. Brooks, Deborah Swift, Kathryn Gauci, John R. McKay, and Ryan Armstrong.

Full disclosure, grab a box of Kleenex and your favorite beverage with this book because you will need it. I connected with characters in such a way I was right there with them. I wish I could say that I read it all in one sitting, but I frequently found myself recovering from such a powerful collection of stories.

I will be the first to admit that I sobbed like a baby with Roberta Kagan’s Bubbe’s Nightingale. I rallied on some fierce heroines in Jean Grainger’s Catriona’s War, Alexa Kang’s The Moon Chaser, Mary D. Brook’s Enemy at the Gates, and Kathryn Gauci’s Code Name Camille. I felt the unbelievable struggle in deciding to choose between your husband and everything else in Marion Kummerow’s Reluctant Informer and Deborah Swift’s The Occupation. I felt right back in Prague in Ellie Midwood’s Killing the Hangman as two brave Czech operatives carried out the perilous mission of assassinating Reinhard Heydrich.  I was swept up with Charles’s small display of protest in  John McKay’s V for Victory as he proved that even small measures can help win a war. I was absolutely terrified for American teen Charles who had the mother of all worst uncles in Ryan Armstrong’s Sound of Resistance. (Seriously, you will need your favorite beverage of choice on that one. I will warn that the language and content was hard to stomach).

As a writer of a teenager heroine in the first book of my series, I will note that loved seeing courageous teens in this anthology. I felt the pain of Brook’s Zoe as she resolved to fight for her Greek homeland after losing her father. I cheered on McKay’s Charles on as he took chalk and paint and boldly marked V for Victory and Vive La France while waiting for his father to come home after being taken prisoner of war. I felt a bond with Armstrong’s Charlie with his love for jazz records amidst his uncle Erich’s brutality.

What always moves me with stories both as a writer and a reader is when I feel so strongly for the character, and each of these ten stories deliver. I loved too the variety of the ages and nationalities of these risk-taking, rule-breaking characters. They were awe-inspiring in courage and heroism. I loved them so much that I am buying more of their work to continue the story.

If you are looking for a good read that will warm these cold winter nights, please read The Darkest Hour. All proceeds go to a worthy cause at the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. If you’re ever in D.C, please go visit this museum. It will fill you with more stories of courage and inspiration amidst darkness.

To purchase your copy, click here: https://amzn.to/2R8uWgg